Category Archives: Celebrate

Tall Ships, July 4, 1976. New York Harbor to Hudson River.In 1976 I lived in a highrise apartment in Yonkers, a few miles up the Hudson River from Manhattan. A couple of friends lived on the same floor but on the river side. From their balcony they had a great view of the river all the way south to the George Washington Bridge.

On July 4, the day of the United States Bicentennial, my friends invited me to come out on their balcony to view Operation Sail. Sixteen ships had sailed to New York City from all over the world to celebrate the 200th anniversary of American Independence. They’d come from Europe, Scandinavia, Central and South America, the Soviet Union and even Japan. All were working ships with young crews learning to sail the way that seafarers had sailed for uncounted centuries.

Of course, I said yes to the invitation. It was Sunday and the weather was fairly clear except for the slight haze that hung over the water. I could make out the pale silhouette of the bridge as we waited for the ships to come into view.

Suddenly one of my friends touched my arm. “Look,” she said, and pointed. I caught my breath. From beneath the bridge, sails were moving upriver. They were faint and far away, growing slowly larger. Soon there were three.

Like the ships from far away that had come into this river three, even four hundred years before, they passed between the dark cliffs on each side of the Hudson, swaying slightly, unrelenting as time. Ghost ships. Haunted ships. Invaders.

I felt my lips grow cold. I was afraid.

The feeling is clear to me even after so many years, maybe more because my reaction was so unexpected. It was as though I’d been standing on the banks of the river that day when the first European ship had come into the estuary. I’d looked up to see a massive craft with great wings that filled with wind and brought the future into my land. A future that I didn’t want and couldn’t have imagined.

I couldn’t look for long. I left the balcony. The image, the feeling, they’ll always stay with me.


My site has moved to my full name, Sally Jane Driscoll (sallyjanedriscoll.com). Hey, that’s here!

Consider this a special thank you for coming along.

It will take time to set up this new site to be as useful as possible, but I’m looking forward to growing my internet presence.

My old blog was a wonderful learning experience. I appreciate each one of you who took the time to stop by, read and participate.

In closing, all I can say is—

Mule, make tracks!

Mark Lieberman: Four Jobs, So Never Between Seasons

Being Between: a series about moving from our current day jobs and life situations toward our true vocations and life goals.

Writers aren’t the only people who juggle more than one life at a time. Mark Lieberman tells how he combines his part-time football broadcasting jobs with his full-time job at a bank.

Just like many Americans, I have more than one job: one full-time job and three part-time seasonal jobs.

The seasonal jobs start the last weekend in August and last through the week before Christmas. They’re only on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. I do get paid and sometimes I get free food, but that’s not why I have ’em. I have ’em ’cause I love what I do!

My full-time job is at Chase Bank in the Unclaimed Property department. I work Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

My seasonal jobs revolve around football. I’m a football statistician for high school games (radio and tv) and for University of Texas at San Antonio games. I started doing high school football radio stats in 1997 and TV stats in 2009. I started doing UTSA football stats this year.  Continue reading

Serena Dracis: Between Lives? Don’t Micromanage the Universe

Being Between: a series about moving from our current day jobs and life situations toward our true vocations and life goals.

In this fifth installment of the Being Between series, Serena Dracis shares her three-step plan of how to work with the gods when they push you into a new life.

Thank you, Sally for inviting me to guest post on your blog! I’m thrilled and honored to be taking part in this series; it’s a subject near and dear to my heart.

Recently I wrote about reincarnation, a subject I love and will probably revisit again and again. If you have a chance and are interested in the topic, I invite you to hop on over and check it out.

Do we live more than one life? The answer is yes—and not always in the soul migration sense.

I often refer to my animal training career as “my past life.” I worked at the sea lion show of the San Diego Zoo for eight happy years during my late 20’s and early 30’s. My life was all about animals, training and educating people about the environment. It was so much fun! Really, I look back at the zoo as the best job I ever had, and the award from my peers for Excellence in Training still hangs proudly on my wall, alongside my animal pictures. I was single, young, and I loved my life. I used to say they’d have to pry my cold, dead body out of the zoo to bury it.

So how did I end up as a married nurse in Seattle, with the wildest animals around me a flock of chickens? It’s a little bit like the old me died and a new me was born.  Continue reading

Charis Maloy: Between Now and the Next Adventure

Being Between: a series about moving from our current day jobs and life situations toward our true vocations and life goals.

In this fourth installment of the Being Between series, Charis Maloy talks about living from day to day while planning for future happiness.

The mad writer Copyright 2012 Charis Maloy All rights reservedWow, Sally really didn’t know what she was getting herself into when she asked me to do a guest spot about transitioning!

Most of my readers know that I’m a busy girl. Multiple jobs plus trying to write and start a small business make for chaos. What Sally wasn’t really aware of are some of the major transitions in my personal life that are affecting the way I relate to work, and the sacrifices that I am making in order to do what needs to be done.

For the last year and a half, I’ve had my status as family doormat thrust down my throat. For the third time in my adult life, I allowed a certain few members of my family to bring me to the brink of bankruptcy. All while I was working nearly 100 hours a week.

In February, the characters in my head demanded that their story be told. On a major writing binge, I began to tell their stories. Then I had to stop and start building timelines to keep them straight because I had anywhere from 8 to 10 characters talking to me at once, telling me that I had, not a book, but a series.

Last May, after nearly twenty years of hiding my true self, I finally worked up the strength within myself to acknowledge that I am lesbian. This, in a small Wyoming town where my biggest support system has always been my very LGBT-unfriendly church. This is also the place where I once put my job on the line by mentioning in an offhand comment that my brother is gay.  Continue reading

Lena Corazon: Learning to Love the Space Between

Being Between: a series about moving from our current day jobs and life situations toward our true vocations and life goals.

In this third installment of the Being Between series, Northern Californian poet, novelist and sociology doctoral candidate Lena Corazon talks about her multiple lives and shares one of her poems.

Even though I’ve been writing poetry, short stories, and novels since I was a little girl, I always considered it to be little more than a hobby, something I did for fun. The route of academia seemed far more practical, and so I decided that I would study for a PhD and become a college professor.

I was lucky enough to get my wish. I entered a PhD program in sociology straight out of college, and quickly learned that grad school, like academia itself, is one big juggling act. For the last four years I’ve been student, teaching assistant, and scholar. I slog my way through 300+ pages of reading each week, grade what feels like mountains of assignments, and look for spare time to cram in my dissertation research.

It’s little surprise that during my first couple of years as a grad student, I didn’t pick up a single novel or write one word of fiction. Why? I had a skewed fantasy in my head about what it meant to be a “serious” scholar. Serious scholars, as far as I was concerned, did not prance about in make-believe worlds. Serious scholars didn’t waste time having conversations with imaginary people. Serious scholars did Very Serious Things, like immerse themselves in social theory and write books filled with academic jargon.  Continue reading

Happy birthday to us, WANA1011!

In October 2011, I took an online course in social media taught by Kristen Lamb along with almost a hundred other writers. Little did we suspect that one year later most of us would still be in touch, celebrating our successes and easing our struggles.

Happy one-year birthday, #WANA1011! Let’s have another. And another. And another after that.

Maeve Binchy

Maeve Binchy

One of my favorite writers has passed away.

Maeve Binchy made everyday life more fascinating than

Vampires, werewolves and zombies

Interstellar travel

Regency dukes

Lost civilizations

Ménages à trois

Secret societies

Aliens

Cannibalistic but intellectual mass murderers

Wizards, warriors and witches

Elves, dwarves and dragons.

That’s a lot for one writer to do

In a single lifetime.

Real is better.

Thanks.